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   Nordic and world braids and bands 2022

TECHNIQUES - OTHER varieties

 Yorkshire Buttons

Class - T2

Gil Dye


A fun session for anyone who can hold a sewing needle, no experience necessary. There are dozens of types of buttons that can be made with a needle and thread, one of the most effective and easiest to make is a Yorkshire button. It is made by stitching over a card template which is removed and replaced by stuffing eg wool scraps, cotton wool, a bead or wooden former, small coin or ring.

The session will include: cutting a template; working and finishing a basic Yorkshire button; ideas for experiment and use of the buttons.

 

Materials

Each student brings:  Reel (or skeins) of cotton perlé #5 or #8, plus small amounts of other threads, including colours and metallics, for experiment. You might also want to include some small beads.

Sewing needle, preferably blunt like a tapestry needle, with an eye that will take your chosen thread. Scissorsfor thread and card (I'm sure others will share if you are unable to bring these). Filling: tutor will have material to use, but bring your own if you have some

 Materials fee: Dkr. 20.  Handout, 4-5 pages in colour.



  Mystery weaving disc for cords

Taster - T3

Susan Foulkes


This taster session is ideal for beginners. I was fascinated by an early twentieth century Lithuanian picture showing a disc for weaving a filled cord. Further research uncovered a 1912 reference and illustration of a similar disc in Java. A local craftsman created a disc for me and I have woven samples using different threads. They are in warp-faced plain weave around a central core. The final cord is very sturdy. In this taster session, you will weave your own tubular cord. I have woven simple linen sacks to hold the disc and warp, so your cord will become the fastening for your sack. You will have two warps, one thick and one thin so you can decide which one to use for the session. The other you can weave later. The cord is simple to weave using a back strap. It is easy to weave without a shuttle. You will learn how to start weaving, how to change the weft and how to finish the cord. You will also learn two bag knots to fasten your cord around the linen sack.

Photos: Four sack ties: twisted cord, lucetted cord, plaited cord, and woven tubular cord. Mystery disc and sack showing two woven tubular cords. Three woven tubular cords: thick and thin.

Each student brings: Scissors and notebook. A camera would be useful.

 Materials fee: Dkr. 140. This fee includes: craftsman-made wooden weaving disc, 2 warps (one warp in thick thread, the other in finer thread with appropriate weft threads), a handwoven linen sack to hold the equipment,instruction leaflet, a simple back strap cord.



Nålbinding

Class - 1D10

Ilta Hämäri


Nålbinding is at least a 6000-year-old Nordic technique by which you create fabric with yarn, a large needle, and your fingers. It has not changed significantly during those years, but there are naturally a lot of variations. This ancient technique has some quirks that makes it fascinating and sometimes infuriating.

The technique is typically worked from left to right, you can’t see the stitches you’re working, your left thumb is the measure of the stitches, there are dozens of stitches, several types of ways to attach to the previous row and the yarn is used in lengths. So there are a lot of new things to learn!

I’ll be demonstrating different nålbound textiles and textures, along with as many stitches as you are interested in. You’ll find out how the thickness and stretch is manipulated and what sort of yarn is best for nålbinding.

Each student brings: paper and pen

 Materials fee: 150 Dkr. This fee includes a hand-made juniper needle and 100 g of thick wool yarn in neutral light colour.


Nålbinding

Taster - T4

Nålbinding is at least a 6000-year-old Nordic technique by which you create fabric with yarn, a large needle, and your fingers. It has not changed significantly during those years, but there are naturally a lot of variations. This ancient technique has some quirks that makes it fascinating and sometimes infuriating.

The technique is typically worked from left to right, you can’t see the stitches you’re working, your left thumb is the measure of the stitches, there are dozens of stitches, several types of ways to attach to the previous row and the yarn is used in lengths. So there are a lot of new things to learn!

I’ll be demonstrating different nålbound textiles and textures, along with as many stitches as we can manage. You’ll find out how the thickness and stretch is manipulated and what sort of yarn is best for nålbinding.